Category Archives: Media

Boy Oh Boy! in the media

Bubby and the Boys

Here’s a link to the article as it appeared in Hamodia, and the text of the article follows:

Bubby_and_the_Boys.pdf

A boy’s cheder ends late, and even when he gets out early on Sundays, it might be close to dark. And that’s without Masmidim or Friday and Motzoei Shabbos learning programs. If Mommy hardly gets a change to spend time with her boys, what can Bubby hope for? Despite all this, determined grandmothers have found ways to bond with their grandsons, from the very youngest, who admittedly are more available, all the way up to the yeshivah bachurim.

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Playing It Rough

Here’s a link to the article as it appeared in Hamodia, and the text of the article follows:

Playing_it_Rough.pdf

They called the game Lion. Or Tiger. Or Cheetah. The nuances between them were clear to the boys but lost on me. All I saw was an inordinate amount of pacing on couches and strategically placed chairs, periodically punctuated by charges, pounces and pummeling of rival cats or unsuspecting prey. They insisted that it was a game, that it was FUN, that everyone involved wanted to play, and that the victim would soon rise, of course, only to be attacked again. Not my idea of entertainment. Then my son went to play at a friend’s house. That night as I put him to bed we spoke about his day. “We played the best game at Mendy’s house!”* he said. “It’s called Moving Truck.’You open up the zipper on the blanket, and a few kids go inside. Then the other boy rolls everyone up inside the blanket, and he kicks you off the bed.” He laughed at the memory. “Wow! That was fun!”

“Oka-a-ay … And no one got hurt?”
“No, we were giggling the whole time.”

Well. At least the timing was right. With this article in the works, Mendy’s mother could expect my call.

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Follow that Siren

Here’s a link to the article as it appeared in Hamodia, and the text of the article follows:

Follow_that_Siren.pdf

This column needs a disclaimer. As I sent out an email to mothers of boys asking them to share their experiences with their boys and sirens, I wondered how it would be received. Sure enough, the responses were split 50-50. Half were enthusiastic, full of tales of boyish energy that ignites in response to a siren call. The other half reminded me of what we all know: In reality, sirens are serious business and really not anything to celebrate.I wavered a few moments, reconsidering, before I began to laugh.Who is responding to my query? Mothers!And that’s precisely why this is material that makes an article. Mothers know what sirens signify, and we take them seriously. Granted, toddlers imitating a siren are merely fascinated by that powerful sound, but surprisingly, older boys know what sirens signify, and yet they still find that sense of danger exhilarating. Es vet gornish helfen! They are boys, and this is how they are wired. A few years ago, our own home was consumed by a fire that the wind quickly blew over to the next two homes as well. Like a drawing in a picture book, the house was physically engulfed in flames that were shooting out of the windows and leaping over the rooftops. After taking refuge in our minivan from the chill, we soon transferred our family to a neighbor’s living room, partially to shield them from watching their house burn down.

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Up, Up and OUT

Here’s a link to the article as it appeared in Hamodia, and the text of the article follows:

UP_up_and_OUT.pdf

It all began with the guest who ran away. Our family was very excited when Uncle Mendy* came to visit. Two bachurim moved out of their room, happy to sleep on mattresses on the floor so Uncle Mendy would have the “guest room.” They kept the grumbling to a minimum when faced with the task of sorting their gazillion stacks of papers, each neatly folded in eight, so that Uncle Mendy would have a surface or two for his own stuff . They transferred their clothes to temporary quarters in other rooms, so as not to disturb Uncle Mendy in the mornings. They needn’t have bothered.
By morning, Uncle Mendy was gone.
We were close to calling 911 when he turned up, poking his head out of the neighbor’s basement, still somewhat bleary-eyed.

What happened?
Alarm clocks.

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When Morah is a Rebbi

Here’s a link to the article as it appeared in Hamodia, and the text of the article follows:

When_Morah_Is_A_Rebbi.pdf

When Morah is a Rebbi

In the K1 classroom on one side of the street, 4-year-old Zevy and his classmates stare wide-eyed at the real fish head while learning about the simanim of Rosh Hashanah. In the K2 classroom across the road, Shimmy and friends nudge closer to get a better look. They eagerly accept an invitation to feel the fish’s face, taking the opportunity to run adventurous fingers over its eyeball. No one takes up the offer to taste that jelly-like orb, but there is a horror in the very thought that thrills Shimmy deliciously.

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Boys Will Be Boys

Here’s a link to the article as it appeared in Hamodia, and the text of the article follows:

Boys-Will-Be-Boys.pdf

Boys Will Be Boys

By Beily Paluch

Mendy is just 11, but he draws great cartoons. With his parents’ encouragement, he now distributes an illustrated story to the boys in his class every Rosh Chodesh. Shimmy is fascinated by the camera he received for his birthday. His mother bought him a few props and lets him practice shooting his siblings as long as their patience allows. Sometimes she gives him permission to wake up early and capture a sunrise from the deck in their backyard.
These boys are having fun indulging in a hobby they enjoy. At the same time, whether they realize it or not, they are developing skills that can eventually help them earn a living.
As our society enables our sons to learn Torah for more years than ever before, these skills can prove invaluable when a yungerman finds himself ready to enter the workforce.

What would your son enjoy?

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Busy or Bust BACHURIM IN CAMP

Here’s a link to the article as it appeared in Hamodia, and the text of the article follows:

BachurimInCamp.pdf

Busy or Bust BACHURIM IN CAMP

By Beily Paluch

It was 2:00 a.m., deep into Friday night, and the singing in the kitchen was still going strong. Just about then, the men and boys exploded in a jubilant dance. Would the bungalow, precariously balanced on cinder blocks, withstand the exuberance?
It was hard to believe that the men and boys in the diverse crowd had never met before.
In fact, it all began with a camp game.
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Boy Oh Boy! Reviewed on Amazon

I loved this book! It was a really fun read and chock-full of helpful information for Orthodox Jewish mothers of boys. The anecdotes sprinkled throughout made me laugh at loud. For those of us raising boys, especially on our own, it takes out some of the angst and replaces it with a sense of camaraderie and fulfillment. Thanks, Beily!

Boy Oh Boy! Free Gift Option in Binah Pre-Call-A-Thon

It was a very special day for me when Binah chose Boy Oh Boy! as one of the four selections offered to subscribers during the Pre-Call-A-Thon renewal drive.

It was even more exciting when they contacted me once, and then again and again, asking for more, more and still more books!

Thank you, Binah readers, for choosing Boy Oh Boy!

http://www.boyohboyblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/Binah-ad.pdf